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Using Visualisation for the Present Continuous


This is an idea I tried out with an elementary group of young learners the other day.  The focus in the coursebook was on teaching the present continuous for actions that are happening now and at the book had very... Continue Reading →

What should Advanced materials involve?


I was recently asked what features I thought good C2 materials should have.  It's quite a good question, especially because there aren't any good GE materials at C2 level.  There are a number of books aimed at preparing students for... Continue Reading →

Instructions: Don’t blame Maria, blame Sharon and Tracy


By day seven of a recent hospitalisation, I had identified four of the non-native speakers who worked on the nursing team.  Apparently there are seven in total, but the ward is large and I may never get to meet the... Continue Reading →

Parsnips in ELT: Stepping out of the Comfort Zone


The concept of Parsnips in ELT has always intrigued me.  These are the things that you're not supposed to talk about with your classes, the taboo topics that might get you into trouble or which your students might protest at.... Continue Reading →

#5TeachingChallenges


It is easy enough to get stuck in your classroom, and stuck in particular ways of thinking about your teaching and your learners and even of course - yourself!  Cambridge English have just launched what look like an interesting professional development... Continue Reading →

Dear Me – to my #youngerteacherself


Dear David, It's been almost fifteen years since you started teaching.  In fact I think at this point back in 2002 you were busy trying to complete the IH London CELTA pre-course task and trying to make sure you had... Continue Reading →

Left Brain – Right Brain: This idea must die


The ever excellent Freakonomics podcast recently put out a podcast called "This Idea Must Die" in which they borrowed a concept from edge.org:  every year Edge.org asks a question and asks its contributors (high level thinkers, scientists, academics and nobel laureates)... Continue Reading →

More Educational Mythbusting


“We have had all kinds of rubbish thrown at us over the last 10 to 20 years,” he says. “We've been told that kids only learn properly in groups. We've had people claiming that children learn using brain gym, people... Continue Reading →

The Myth of the Good Student


Not so long ago I found out that two of my teenage students have been having a competition in my classes.  Apparently they've been trying to see who can say the word "genitais" the most in class - this means "genitals"... Continue Reading →

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